What would you like to see here?


I’m having some thoughts and second-thoughts about where I want to go with this blog. I have been concerned to be honest, that I’ve been putting in too much of the personal stuff and have actually adjusted some of my posts to ‘password protected’. This is likely to be a temporary measure while I have a think… but in the meantime, I want to ask you what direction you would like me to go in.

Thanks!

17 thoughts on “What would you like to see here?

  1. I think that firstly just by having this site and your blog in existence provides a great degree of support and a voice for mental health issues in social work, which is greatly needed so I thank you for that. such a platform as this gives a sense of release and a voice for those if us that work in the field.

    I would like political commentary and discussion on contemporary policy issues of the day , which affect us and those whom we work alongside. A site such as this can provide a valuable sounding board for new and progressive ideas.

    The work this site already does has proved invaluable to me since I found it and whether the posts are more personalised or generic looking at wider issues , you can’t go far wrong imo.

    mark

  2. Thanks for your kind words. I have to say that my gut feeling is to move away from some of the personal stuff but I just wanted to get a feel of ideas/thoughts in general 🙂

  3. I really like the mix of both, but having just stopped blogging on mine for the same reasons (felt like it was getting to be too much personal) I totally understand wanting to go in a new direction. Anything you’d do with it, I’d read! 🙂

    (but I really like the posts where you write about the policies because I’m always interested in comparing to ours in the U.S.)

  4. I have been following this blog for a month now and you are doing fine with your content. Just write about what you feel comfortable with.

  5. Jae Ran and Good Worker – thanks so much for your kind words and thanks to everyone who responded to me.

    I think I am just in the middle of a bit of a rut and am wanting to think about where to direct most of my energies. But feedback is always good. I like these polls 🙂

  6. I really enjoy your posts about fostering, but I can totally understand why you might want to step back from self disclosure. That’s a very personal thing to write about, and it has to be a decision that you are comfortable with, otherwise you just end up causing yourself a headache. Your posts about social work are important CB, and you write very fairly, I think your blog is quite unique in that way. That whilst you seem to be expressing a personal opinion, it’s always backed up with why in practice things are not quite as they should be. I hope that you figure out a way to come out of your rut, I do enjoy your posts whatever the topic.

    Lola x

  7. My own site (http://survivinglimbo.blogspot.com) Surviving Limbo is similar to yours, but I’m a beginner. I’ve been using a mixture of both, but I have the same worries you do, primarily because I’ve been verbally attacked by people not on the site itself but face to face or via other social media. I’ve also been thanked over and over. So…here’s my take. Thank you for being brave and giving voice to all of us, both diagnosed or not, who struggle daily with mental health problems.

  8. Thanks Lola 🙂
    And to everyone who left comments here on the post. I’m drawing to a conclusion and it’s really helped me do that.

  9. I’ve not been a reader for long but I have liked the mix of professional and personal. I think that most of what is out there already elsewhere is a bit lacking in human experience and, after all, this is your blog and I think it should be about what you want it to be.

  10. Time flies in the blogosphere and I bet it is a process of finding yourself in cyberspace which is distorting and demanding. Don’t know whether you should think of the blog as a potential ‘micro business’ ie setting up levels of access, making it profitable in some way? Or in the widest possible way to find out how much authority the blog has in the profession?

    Referencing it to others..finding out if people from a really wide range of professions and occupations use it. I haven’t really seen any really ‘next generation’ blogs. Maybe you should be in social work publishing, setting the agenda, publishing ideas in an environment where you could really make a difference? What about getting in touch with the Big Issue and writing a column for them? There’s nothing wrong with the blog just that your ideas need a wider and more developed and develping audience, I think!

    Kind regards

    Paula

  11. Time flies in the blogosphere and I bet it is a process of finding yourself in cyberspace which is distorting and demanding. Don’t know whether you should think of the blog as a potential ‘micro business’ ie setting up levels of access, making it profitable in some way? Or in the widest possible way to find out how much authority the blog has in the profession?

    Referencing it to others..finding out if people from a really wide range of professions and occupations use it. I haven’t really seen any really ‘next generation’ blogs. Maybe you should be in social work publishing, setting the agenda, publishing ideas in an environment where you could really make a difference? What about getting in touch with the Big Issue and writing a column for them? There’s nothing wrong with the blog just that your ideas need a wider and more developed and developing audience, I think!

    Kind regards

    Paula

  12. tmwjackson – thanks 🙂
    Paula – I think you’ve just about been here (on the blog and commenting) longer than anyone else! You might have been the first person to comment ever and you are certainly the most regular commenter so I thank you for that! I don’t really want to go down the profitability path (I don’t think I could anyway) because I have a job which is full-time (often more than full time!) and sometimes I think there would be greater demands with more at stake.
    Currently, anything more ambitious needs more time and that’s one thing that I’m sadly rather short of as I am trying to branch out in other directions.. maybe one day they are things to come back to.
    But really, thank you so much for your support 🙂

  13. I guess I don’t read health/social care blogs for extensive personal accounts of what’s going on in the author’s personal life, so extensive sequential posts about the author’s domestic arrangements, relationship changes, recipes, holiday plans and the like becomes less relevant if that dominates the blog.

    Conversely, simple facts and information can be gained from official sites and sources, so reproducing information alone isn’t useful.

    What I find useful and engaging in a blog is when the author, from either their background or their understanding or their cleverness, takes an issue (or some new legislation, or a change in practice, or an opportunity) and through their understanding shares detail or illuminates a perspective that I’d not considered. This analysis or reflection or interpretation or framing of issues is something bloggers can do brilliantly.

    What I find appealing is when this is done through a well written blog, with a humane dimension. Knowing something of the author is useful in connecting with them. Whether it’s detail or not, I guess I feel more connected with a blog and more likely to be involved if I get a measure of if the author’s passionate or burnt out, youthful or worldly, male or female, a manager or coal face practitioner, NHS/Council or private practice and so on. Knowing if someone’s a busy mum or frazzled student or jaded nurse manager who’s long in the tooth helps me get where the opinion/analysis is coming from, adding context, so knowing something of an author is useful.

    Also, if it’s bland with no account of clinical encounters/elements of real patients (without identifiers, obviously) it feels a little detached and theoretical/hypothetical and waffly and not “real” so I think that blogging about elements of the content of your working world (particularly since social work is aligned with but different to my world) it make it infinitely more insightful and interesting.

    Just my 2p worth, the key is to write what you’re happy to write 😛

  14. I’m finding the social work/social policy posts interesting, because while I can always read statistics and reports elsewhere I don’t often get to see what happens on the front line. It’s not my world (which is criminology, among other things) but close enough to it to be really interesting.

    On the other hand you should feel free to comment on personal things if you feel the urge to do it. Nothing wrong in that, and it can be interesting in other ways. We’re not wholly captives of our professional lives, after all. Or shouldn’t be.

  15. Thanks 🙂 I think for the moment, I was having a few jitters and I think I know where I want to go. Less on the personal posts and more on the substance ones but as it is, I find it hard to write about things I am not interested in or don’t have a feeling about so hopefully that will add the personal flavour. Or nothing might change at all!

  16. I was just wondering – how does blogging work when you are a social worker? If you put too many personal posts you run the risk of being identified and outed.

    Somebody told me that a social worker friend told her one of her social worker friends was fired for writing on facebook “another case assigned, looking forward to the weekend!” which seems a little extreme.

    So, how does it work when you are a social worker and want to blog/tweet? Do you have to thoroughly police yourself?

    I tweet but don’t discuss work. I’d guess that maybe 5% of my followers know what my profession is and that’s only because they know me in real life.

  17. fos – you have got to the core of my dilemma. Whenever I have written about cases, I’ve masked some of the facts or changed them because I wouldn’t want them to be identifiable – but that’s why I want to move more to less personal stuff to be honest. I felt fairly ‘safe’ at the beginning but to be honest, the blog has grown a lot more than I ever expected it to and it is increasingly likely that I will be identified – especially as I’ve spoken about some things that are particular to me – like the fostering, like the operation. Anyone in my team would know it’s me.
    I feel confident I could continue if I stick to broader issues – what’s happening in the news and social policy developments but I’m not sure how interesting that would be – and therein lies my dilemma.

Comments are closed.