Personal Budgets in Practice


Recently, I’ve been working with a service user and his carer (daughter) to put together a  support plan or rather two support plans – one for him and one for his daughter . The two live together and without his daughter’s presence, there is no doubt at all that the man, G, would be in residential care so the personal budget is relatively substantial.  G has advanced dementia. His daughter who is a strong advocate for him and a devoted carer has given  up her job in order to care for her father. She receives carers allowance which is a pitiful £55.55. Think about that – for constant care (yes, she gets respite but that is sparse and shrinking).

As for creativity with G’s support plan, it isn’t particularly, because he has quite specific personal care needs and there is no scope for much creativity regarding tasks apart from the ability to potentially employ someone from outside the usual agencies.  Oh, we can choose the time and the ‘blocks of care’ but the type of care needed is specific so we can’t ‘skip a shower one day so there’s more time for a bath the next (seriously, that was suggested in one of the training sessions I attended!)’ as health reasons determine the need for regular visits. G’s support plan is, what we call a ‘managed personal budget’. That means that a virtual budget is assigned to G and I make the arrangements for agencies to cover the specified hours. I don’t get a choice of agencies. The agencies that are employed are those that have won ‘bidding’ contests with the local authority and are party to block contracts.

This ‘counts’ as a ‘personal budget’ for the purposes of the local authorities’ ‘figures’ even though the effect is exactly the same as it was prior to the ‘personalisation agenda’ – no, wait, there is a difference. I have three times the amount of paperwork to complete. Am I working in a more ‘person-centred’ way – well, I hope that I was ALWAYs involving service users and carers in care planning. That’s not to say that direct payments haven’t been enormously liberating and positive for a lot of service users. I absolutely don’t believe that everyone should have ‘managed’ personal budgets but it is a fallacy to believe the ‘hype’ that this personalisation agenda has brought the same benefits for all service users.

So we move to the idea that Burstow promotes that all support plans should be delivered by direct payments. We discussed delivering this package via direct payments, when I promoted even a slither of interest, I invited someone from our direct payments team round to meet the family (because they can ‘sell it’ better than me and can answer all the detailed questions about implementation and finances that sometimes I can’t) and we stalled. Why? Because G’s daughter felt genuinely stressed and frightened at the thought of employing someone directly – the agencies that accept the direct payments amounts are limited and don’t include her preferred agency and if she went with the preferred agency, her father would lose vital necessary hours of care.  She has little enough time to herself as it is and spending more time managing and planning her father’s care processes was something she felt that we should be doing.

Her father has very poor cognitive functioning to the extent that communication is very difficult.  The direct payment option, was, she saw, a way to push more stress onto her as a carer.

This is a reality that some of those who are implementing the wonderful new world of everyone receiving direct payments type personal budgets really have to address.

However I do have a more positive story to follow up on. That is that she, (M’s daughter) has a carer’s personal budget for herself which is delivered via a direct payment. While I won’t go into the details about what has been provided, you’ll have to trust me on this as I say we have been able to be incredibly ‘creative’ with the support planning of the carer’s personal budget and it will have an immediate positive effect on her quality of life. So all’s well that end’s well.

Generally, I have had a lot of success with carer’s personal budgets being implemented and I think that has been because the money provided (although not very much) is money in addition to the core care needs for the cared-for person.  There is a scope for more interesting ideas of things to use the money for.

It’s hard to see how more creativity can be instilled without more money and as long as the figures allow ‘managed’ personal budgets to be ‘counted’ we won’t have a real idea of how ‘ground-breaking’ these programmes are.

I don’t know the answers to these problems – I hope some of those consultants who are paid multiples of my salary and can spend all their days in discussions and consultations are able to come up with some genuinely practical responses rather than the usual ‘try harder/work harder/involve users (as if we don’t do all this already’.

Let’s see.

And on a final unrelated point, I saw a link to this blog yesterday on Twitter. It is written by the 18 year old son of someone with Alzheimer’s and I found it excellent and insightful.

3 thoughts on “Personal Budgets in Practice

  1. “G’s daughter felt genuinely stressed and frightened at the thought of employing someone directly”

    I found that that was usually always the point at which people decided against direct payments or an IB.

    I know in my area we were able to point towards non-profit agencies (one local, one not so local) who could assist with the admin, but for support to be ongoing it would need to be built into the cost of the care plan. I dont know what budgets are like now, but I suspect it would be problematic in some areas to secure the necessary funding.

    I also beleive you are 100% right in that there is, particularly with personal care, only so much creativity that’s possible. What people want is not creativity, but something much more simple – In my experience almost all people want the same thing; a regular carer they have a good rapport with who turns up more-or-less on time.

    Whilst this can be potentially be achieved with personalisation, it is undermined (or at least was in my area) by the other moves towards big agencies which wiped out the small ones in the area so reducing choice drastically.

  2. Thanks for the comment – I know you have a lot of experience in this area.We have found a definite decrease in the non profit orgs picking up some of the slack which is not what was expected..

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