Distractions and Uncertainty


Of Local Distractions

I met one of the hospital social workers earlier this week. We don’t actually catch up with each other very often but when we do we always make a point of hanging around in whatever corridor we bump into each other in and chat.

This time, we again commented on the ebb and flow of work which seems to be balancing on an almost perpetual ebb without much flow at the moment.

We are all on edge at the moment. Another reconfiguration is in the pipeline and so many rumours are abounding that it is making it very difficult to actually get very much done.  Announcements and decisions are in the offing and have been put back again and again so all we know is that ‘this is a big one’ and that some jobs are going.

Good place to leave it with us, management team!

Seriously I do wonder if any of the so-called management executives who are paid most highly with their years of skills of organising complex projects ever remember those very first baby steps in communication skills and ponder on the way that rumours spread when a team of people are bereft of actual facts.

So my kind of friend, the hospital social worker, filled me with a swathe of new rumours that I hadn’t heard before about how our jobs were going to be directly affected by these changes and in turn, I shared with him the hotch-potch rumours that I’d heard from another AMHP at a training session a couple of weeks ago who, although she is prone to hyperbole, still seemed to deliver a fairly gloomy outcome of what might happen to all our jobs.

We smile. We chuckle. We remind ourselves how complicit we are in spreading the uncertainty through these rumours. Then I return to the office and immediately tell everyone what I’ve just heard from my new source about the talk that is going around at the hospital. He, in turn, no doubt returns to his hospital team with the latest gossip in the ‘community teams’.

And in the meantime, of course, work goes on. The increasingly distressed calls. The organisation and co-ordination of assessments and the desperate attempts to make some kind of priority from the pieces of information that have been fed through to us.

This is life at the bottom of an organisation when the top is reorganising. This is the pit of the rumour mill where scraps of invented truths and fears are ground together and occasionally spit out nonsense but this is what we are talking about in the large open plan offices. This is what is happening while the government is talking about pumping more money into the NHS. This is what is happening when officials are prevaricating and making the policies that end up on intranet sites that we don’t have time to access and read.

And it made me think of Southern Cross – I’ve been thinking about Southern Cross a lot lately.

Of National Job Losses

The announcement of 3000 job cuts yesterday although, I suppose, unsurprising coming from a company that is in such severe financial straits. Considering that they have sold off their property assets, staff costs are likely to be one of their highest expenditures. I wonder how the staff employed today feel. I wonder how the residents who  might have built up relationships with staff members feel and I wonder how people who are about to make placements in care homes feel.

Am I less likely to place someone in a Southern Cross Care Home today? Yes.

The Independent states that

The jobs to be axed are expected to include over 300 nurses,1,275 care staff, almost 700 catering posts, 440 domestic jobs and 238 maintenance posts

They don’t sound very ‘back office’ to me. Although Southern Cross maintains that this will not affect quality of care provision, it rather makes you wonder what the staff were doing in that case.

Ideally, it would be useful to check the data from CQC inspection reports to see what the inspectors said about staffing. The difficulty is that publicly available inspection reports that are recent enough to give up to date evidence.

I decided to look at a few random Southern Cross inspection reports from the London area.  Professor Google spat out some results and this is by no means scientific as I didn’t have the time for a more extensive ‘study’.

Romford Grange? Good report in 2008. That seems in order. Of course 2008 is three years ago now. A long time between actual inspections but we know they are not actually going to do inspections so frequently now. Still, three years seems to be pushing it. Lots can change overnight, let alone in three years.

Tower Bridge Care Centre? Well, that had an inspection in 2010. Oh good, I think. But wait, that was only because there were concerns regarding medication management that had been raised specifically.

Another random check on Camberwell Green Care Home  – oh, an inspection in 2010, surely that’s a good sign? Silly me, the recent inspections seem only to be where there are problems identified. Here’s what the report says

The service has been performing poorly for some time and matters have not been addressed by Southern Cross.They have started to do that recently but that has lead to lots of staffing changes and a turbulent time including managers leaving quickly. The ship has been steadied by a management team who have been sent in to the home. This inspection has identified some of their successes but more work is needed and a key need is for a stable, consistent management team to be in place. Until such time we can only view the home as adequate

Care planning is not personalised and is not considering all areas of individuals need, therefore the care arrangements are not always well informed.
The complaint’s procedure needs to be improved, it has to be open and transparent with complainants feeling that they are listened to and that issues are acted upon. Communication too is not as good as it should be, all issues whether they are minor concerns or not must be addressed.
Despite staff receiving up to date training on Safeguarding Vulnerable people,
procedures are still not fully robust at the service.

Burgess Park? Oh, it had 4 inspections in 2010. That’s what I call exceptionally good monitoring. Ah, one look at the most recent report and you’ll see that it is because there are problems that there has been so many inspections.

For example, their April 2010 inspection report states that

Our observations of a lunchtime on the second day of the inspection showed us that the systems for shift planning need to be improved. We saw that one member of staff was the only person in the dining room where there were fifteen service users. They needed various degrees of assistance and we observed that the lack of staff caused difficulties for them An example was a service user who had to wait an unreasonably long time to be assisted to go to the WC; another service user fell asleep while waiting to be assisted to eat her meal.

and while the July report says that these issues have been ‘addressed’ and more staff were recruited, it does make you wonder where the cuts are going to come from.

Lauriston House? Home to 100 older and disabled  adults – last inspected in 2007.  In fact, a random glance at the ‘most recent available assessments to view’ tells a sorry tale.

Previous reports

  • Inspection report 2007/10/26
  • Inspection report 2006/09/06
  • Inspection report 2005/11/15
  • Inspection report 2005/08/05
  • Inspection report 2004/12/14
  • Inspection report 2004/06/29

Oh, it got a good report. In 2007. But for 100 people, that’s a pretty poor show. In fact, if anything is to tell the tale of the toothlessness of the CQC and the way that CSCI was heading prior to it’s inception – it’s that list of dates. Look on it, ministers and make a decision if that is the level of scrutiny and regulation you want to maintain?

Back to the job losses though. So what will that mean for today’s residents and staff? Uncertainty. Rumours. Whispering.

Whatever we say when we look back at what we can achieve and improve today for our own old age and for that of our children – we definitely can’t say we are living in uninteresting times.

2 thoughts on “Distractions and Uncertainty

  1. Hi cb,

    I’m sorry that you are facing this very uncomfortable state of uncertainty. It brings back the awful memories of how things were for me in the marketing arena when the recession took its tool and we had far less business than the norm for months on end… and then the rumors began….

    I’m wishing you the best and crossing my fingers (no religious intent, only for good luck) that you and your department are spared… and that additional money gets allocated so that this fear may be allayed. It is NOT an easy thing to live with.

    My advice is to on the one hand, ignore it and focus on your work (to reduce your anxiety – it’s not as if worrying about it will resolve anything), and two, slowly start preparing for a back-up plan should the worst-case scenario come to be… i.e., update your resume, start looking at what else is available… etc.

    If all goes well, that’s great and you have an updated resume and a feeling for what other positions are out there that could be appealing. If things fall apart, you are prepared…

    Best wishes 🙂

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