Weekly Social Work Links 23


I’m coming in a day ‘late’ with this week’s round-up post due to some sickness in the household. The benefits are that I can now pick up some of the great posts that were published yesterday. Might well stick to Sunday in the future!

As always, please feel free to add any posts I may have missed out in the comments or links to other sites (preferably related!) that I haven’t come across.

Have a nice rest-of-weekend!

I’m starting with a post from Awake and Dreaming about discrimination and difficulty faced through the stigma of mental illness herself and some reflections on how it affects other people.

Via The (Not So) Cheap Social Worker, in a post about social work and the laws of economics the author links to an interesting post by Dr Lynn K Jones who writes about the poor wages that social work has attracted in relation to education and qualification level. It’s fascinating to read the US perspective – not least because I think I’m very well paid as a social worker!.  Maybe it’s about salary expectations..

How not to Do Social Work had a glimpse into the appeals of gang culture to children in care – probably something that’s a lot more prevalent in my ‘patch’ than his by the sounds of it but there’s danger, as he points out, in complacency.

On the day before the Dilnot Commission reports on a plan for future funding for care in the UK, Do No Harm has a post about the Singaporean system and the Maintenance of Parent Act where ‘children’ can be compelled to pay for their parents’ support. He writes, giving an example

She has children but is not on good terms with them in spite of the fact that they are working. When applying for financial assistance, she is informed that she should be able to request for regular income from the children, and that she should apply for maintenance should the children not be providing for her. Only when children are unable to support, or the court decides that there is no grounds for the children to care for their parent, would financial assistance be provided.

I doubt that would go down well with the middle-class electorate here. Do read the post though, it challenges some of the assumptions we make about care for older adults in society.

Meanwhile, SocialJerk reflects with pride (pun intended) on the New York State Legislature’s acceptance of same sex marriage.

Dorlee has another interview on her site, this time with someone who does Family Therapy. As ever, a great read!

Social Over(Worker) shares a painful story about adoption from the viewpoint of the sibling of an adoptee.

From Media to Social Work shares her thoughts more extensively about this story.

Meanwhile the author of Deck of Many Things, a social work student, shares her thoughts about transferable skills after coming into social work from a different profession (IT related) and multi-faceted and thoughtful approach to systems theory – showing, in itself, the importance of different backgrounds in the tapestry of the profession.

Finally, I want to add a link to one more site, After Alice,  which will be particularly interesting/useful to UK social workers who are involved in the roll out of personalisation (as I am and I make no apology!). It is this blog of a support planning officer and I really look forward to following and reading it.

Enjoy Sunny Sunday!

3 thoughts on “Weekly Social Work Links 23

  1. Thanks so much, cb, for your kind inclusion of my interview with family/couples therapist Dr. Laurel Wiig in your post!

    Your support is most appreciated 🙂

    Take care,
    Dorlee

  2. “Via The (Not So) Cheap Social Worker, in a post about social work and the laws of economics the author links to an interesting post by Dr Lynn K Jones who writes about the poor wages that social work has attracted in relation to education and qualification level. It’s fascinating to read the US perspective – not least because I think I’m very well paid as a social worker!. Maybe it’s about salary expectations..”

    I think it is totally about expectations. As a social worker (because I am in healthcare) I am very well paid, however, as a person with a Masters Degree, not so much…

  3. Yeah, fair point. I never considered comparisons just on the basis of having ‘a masters’ as I’m sure I’m earning more than many full-time PhD students who might have Masters in Arts and Social Sciences.

Comments are closed.