Weekly Social Work Links 25


A day late this week (although my original intention which might not have been very clearly stated) was always that it would be a ‘weekend’ project rather than a specifically Saturday project! This was a fairly emotionally trying week for me at work with the shadow of an unexpected news which shook me a fair bit. I couldn’t really face doing a round-up post yesterday but here’s my attempt for today. Apologies to all those wonderful posts that I miss out – please feel free to add them in the comments.

DorleeM has a useful and interesting post/interview which, in its course, define ‘racial microaggressions’.  I think it reflects a lot of issues around self-definitions, respect and empowerment.  It’s interesting to see the different uses of language as well – which is an aspect I’m particularly curious about with the use, in the United States of the term ‘Persons of Color’ (spelling intentional) where we would, in the UK refer to Minority Ethic groups. I have a difficulty with definitions related purely to ‘ethnicity’ as it seems to imply there is an intrinsic difference but am equality uncomfortable with ‘color’ being a sole redefining factor as an extrinsic difference.  Maybe that’s a thought for a post in itself but I think back to the ways that language defines our thought processes.

This post is actually from last week but I am including it because it’s a new blog I found from a Social Work Student (about to qualify) from Australia who is writing about some of the challenges of finding a job – it certainly seems that some issues are international in scope.

And another new blog to ‘turn up’ is Inspired Social Work written by a Hospital Social Worker in Canada – she writes over two posts, some hints for if you ever find yourself in hospital – part one is here – and part two is here. Again, very transferable guidance!

If there’s one post that really riled me this week, it was this one. I don’t want to go into deep explanations as to why as I hope it is obvious but I think it is a poor indication of the expectations of students in the UK if they downplay theories and want to be solely taught how to process and complete tasks. As I said on Twitter, the training is a degree not an apprenticeship. Tasks can and should be taught by employers and we have too little genericism as it is.  It also makes me think about the purpose of university degrees. Are they to educate or to roll out ‘ready to employ’ graduates? There is an element of giving the rod rather than the fish here and we all have to take responsibility for our own learning but the theories give the profession important boundaries and guidelines – otherwise we just complete task after task without a wider context and that becomes dangerous.

How not to do Social Work expounds on the difficulties of keeping work fresh and the importance of training, reflection and resources.

S.Wangene  on ‘A Social Workers View’ writes about the moves to revise the international definition of Social Work.

Social Worker Mom identifies a problem and issue I’ve seen so many times but it never gets easier – Exercising the Right to Make a Bad Decision  . Although she has put it in the context of service users, I find myself doing it as well from time to time..

Meanwhile in Studentland – From Media to Social Work takes another step on the road towards her career change with her resignation from her job and  at a Deck of Many Things, thought turns towards Dissertation subjects – along with a useful analysis – coming from someone who is trained and worked as a scientist – on the differences between ‘research’ in science and social science.

Malcolm Payne poses an interesting question ‘Why do we expect the truth from case records?’  As I’ve had to do a lot of case recording analysis this week, it certainly rang some bells with me about assumptions and again, the language we sometimes use. Interesting.

Adventures of a (not so) cheap Social Worker comments on news that Charlie Sheen is going to be playing a Social Worker in a new TV show.

And Social Jerk in a timely fashion, spreads a bit of social work magic into Harry Potter’s obviously too prosaic world.

Enjoy the rest of the weekend.

4 thoughts on “Weekly Social Work Links 25

  1. Thanks so much, cb, for your kind mention of my post.

    (So sorry to hear that you experienced a loss this week…please accept my deepest condolences. I think the loss of people you love is one of the hardest things about life/growing up…)

    On a lighter/different note, regarding the use of the term “persons of color,” please feel free to comment/question Danielle directly in post as to why she chose to use this particular term…I would generally think/refer to people of minority groups as simply belonging to minority groups or minority ethnic groups as you suggested.

    However, I am not a typical American in that I have been raised half my childhood abroad…and this may color (no pun intended) my use of language.

  2. Thanks for your comments. I will go direct to the blog to comment but my brain has been a bit all over the place so the thought only occurred to me this morning as I was putting this together..

  3. If, as the Inspired Social Work blog indicates, there is no need for any support from family members when someone is in hospital – they get round-the-clock state-of-the-art care from doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants etc – then Canada must be a good place to get ill!

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