Waiting for Dilnot

The Dilnot Commission on Care Funding and Support is due to report back to the government on Monday 4th July.

At Arbitrary Constant there is some useful background reading about the Green and White Papers which were published by the previous government regarding changes to the funding of adult social care.  It will indeed, by interesting to compare and contrast with the proposals set out on Monday.

The scare stories about the Dilnot report  started emerging from the press over the weekend with the Observer reporting on a £35,000 cap on payments towards care while the The Times (£) write about a cap of up to 30% of the value of a property.

The very thought about paying for care at these levels seems to strike fear and anger in the  heart of the property-owning middle classes and perish the thought that they might actually need to pay towards the cost of their care. Although it’s important to remember that social care costs can be potentially incurred at any point in someone’s life. It isn’t necessarily about ‘saving up’ till old age or insurance schemes at the age of 60. What if you need the services at the age of 55 or 25?

The King’s Fund has a post which underlines the major issues and potential obstacles to implementation.

And the Guardian yesterday had a good summary piece which seems to have some of the potential details and difficulties highlighted

Meanwhile Community Care reports that there is expected to be a hostile public reaction to Dilnot. The article says

That was the warning today from housing and care provider Anchor, who found that 44% of Britons believed the state should fund all their care costs in a survey of over 2,000 people.

Which is the crux. No-one wants to pay for what they think they should be getting free. The payments into the ‘system’ and into ‘national insurance’ should cover care costs. The thing is, they don’t and they can’t.

Cost have escalated. It isn’t just about care home fees, home care packages and support plans delivered through personal budgets are increasing as people with higher care needs can remain at home for longer.

The sometimes seemingly arbitrary divide between health care needs (free) and social care needs (means-tested) can generate understandable anger as systems like the continuing healthcare assessments can be incredibly complicated and seemingly counter to common sense understandings of what ‘health’ care actually is.

There seems to be a proposal to separate out ‘hotel costs’ of the care home from ‘social care’ costs which will, I expect, lead to all sorts of interesting accounting mechanisms to ensure that the highest fees can be garnered beyond whatever system is implemented.

But I want to be hopeful.  Dilnot is unlikely to be popular in ‘Daily Mail’ land, there are murmurings in ‘Guardian’ land too. Maybe we just need all parties to actually work together for the good of the whole at this point rather than worry about the cost in votes that any change in a system might incur.

Means Testing and Social Care Funding

Community Care reports that  Dilnot who is chairing the latest in a long, long line of consultations into care funding has heard overwhelming opposition to retaining the £23,000 savings threshold before people have to start paying towards their social care needs.

Charges for social care are a delicate political issue so not content with one report, each government seems to want to commission a dozen until they find one that says what they want to say politically.

As someone who doesn’t have any ideological issues with means-testing, I find the constant pushing of limits hard to understand.

If someone has money, surely they can and should pay for a service and if someone doesn’t have the money, the state should subsidise. Seems quite a good system.

That’s not to say there aren’t problems with the system as it is at the moment. There are lots. It is overcomplicated for a start. There is an element of the ‘postcode lottery’ about it.

The costs are increasing rapidly and, this is the rub, no-one wants to pay for social care. No-one. Whether they have £50 in the bank or £5000 or £5000000 – people have become used to receiving health care free and seem to make assumptions about the provision of social care on the same basis until they are actually made aware of the costs involved.

One of the most perfidious arguments I come across is the ‘I/my mother/my gran worked hard all her life so why should she pay when Mr Brown who has been on benefits all his life doesn’t?’.

Perhaps because you/your mother/your gran actually have the money to pay and Mr Brown doesn’t.

There is a lot of righteous indignation around in this country with people measuring what they have against what others have and what they get against what others get and seeing things as ‘unfair’. Unfair is a government that gives those who ‘have’ a free ride even if they have assets in the hundreds of thousands and restrict access to services for people who have the same and higher needs and fewer assets to pay for them.

Maybe you would prefer Mr Brown’s life of poverty on benefits or in a low paid job to your life where you’ve received a dignified wage and been able to save?

Or does it all come down to stamping ones’ foot and wanting to save your children’s inheritance?

I know this isn’t a popular view. Certainly Dilnot is going to reject it. The thought of – gasp – having to pay for social care if you have savings is such an anathema to the middle classes who have the loudest voices in the political process that it seems already to have been summarily dismissed out of hand.

The thought of having to sell the home to pay for care has been put up as the massive failing in the current system. Is it a failing? I’m not sure. The houses are are discounted from the sums if there is a partner who is disabled or over 60 living in them.

A charge can be put on the home by the local authority so the sale can be delayed until after the death of the person in question. Rental charges can be used to pay towards care fees if the family doesn’t want to sell the home.

Anyway, that’s likely to change because the home-owning electorate don’t like to pay for care for their parents when Mr Brown-on-benefits my be getting something for free.

One thing I am in favour of though, is the capping of care costs at a certain level if someone has very high needs. We used to have this in the local authority but as we’ve moved into more austere times, it has been abolished. While I think means testing is, by its nature, fairer, I don’t think anyone should be penalised if they have extremely high care needs.

The problem of course is that if people who have funds won’t and don’t pay – then who will? Why the state of course. Perhaps through the hideously conceived ‘insurance’ policies that the Conservatives dreamt-up pre-election which showed an ignorance of the details of care but could ‘insure’ someone with a lump sum payment (£8000 was suggested)  against care home costs in the future.  Another of Lansley’s gems. We really are seeing the measure of the man now.

I’ll be following Dilnot’s recommendations with interest. Just as I’ve tried to follow the very frequent and oft ignored proposals that have popped up again and again about the funding of long term care until the music stops and the government decides on the one that will win the most votes for them.

It’s a shame that so many games are being played in the name of ‘fairness’ where ‘fairness’ seems to only be referring to the wealthier, home-owning middle classes – but that’s where the votes are.

Cynical? Well, perhaps just a little bit!