The REAL College of Social Work – Part Infinity

BASW and SCIE may be planning to merge to form BASWCOSWSCIESWBOFEETOFIIB.

(British Association of Social Workers College of Social Work Social Care Institute of Excellence Social Work College But Only For England Even Though Our First Initial Is British)

Trips off the tongue.

Having a Scottish parent though, makes me feel marginalised by this new college, much though I approve of the name – so in the spirit of yesterday’s fiery post, I’ve decided to set up my own College.

It will be called the College of People  With Social Work Qualifications and Those Who Are Studying Social Work.  CPWSWQATWASSW.

Good thing I grabbed the domain name  quickly and have been sitting on it for two years, biding my time.

My proposals are:-

To create a job for myself so I can move away from front line practice

To create jobs for my friends so they don’t have to actually do anything that involves social work but we can talk infinitely about what’s best for the profession.

To produce an online magazine because print is so last millennium.

To promote links with social work organisations internationally – cough cough, free trips to the Caribbean to ‘investigate’ how services work there, please.

Membership will be open to anyone who wants to join.

To set up a new set of capacibilities that will be expected of all social workers –

– these will include

– being able to type at least 40 wpm

– advocacy skills when working with oppressive  management regimes

–   Being able to work with Housing departments without raising your voice.

– Ensuring chocolate and biscuit supplies are constantly replenished in your place of work

– The importance of washing your own mug not using your colleague’s  special kitten mug because that makes her really angry – especially if you don’t wash it up.

– Not hiding paperwork in drawers to make your desk (if you have one) look tidier.

– Never being more than one hour late for pre-arranged visits.

There will be a consultation period of one week.

Membership will be free today only but after today will rise to £10,000 per annum to pay for my living costs and trips to the Caribbean.  As I don’t believe in paypal and secure transactions are overrated you can just leave your bank details in the comments below and I’ll be in touch.

Special concessionary rate for international members if they live somewhere I want to go on holiday to and can put me up free of charge for at least a week.

Irresistable, I know.

World Social Work Day

Tomorrow is World Social Work Day. As I am taking a break from updating the blog this week (apart from today!), I am writing my post for the day now.

I wanted to consider a few things in relation to the ‘celebratory day’ such as it is although celebration seems a bit raw in the face of the  humanitarian disaster taking place in Japan. I don’t want for there to have to be these disasters to provide context. People do not need to suffer in order for me to learn. But my human reaction to those pictures is to look inside myself for ways that I can console my own thoughts. Part of human nature is to look for answers. We have enquiring minds. I am not religious although I toy with agnosticism. I thought the Independent’s piece was thoughtful though.

Back to World Social Work Day. I’m not doing anything special to ‘celebrate’ apart from going to work. Which I think, in this economic climate and amid the vagaries of chance and an angry earth, more to celebrate on this Monday morning than I might credit.

I am going to spend World Social Work Day not celebrating as such. I think for me, the day will be more about inward reflection and consideration of what it means to me to be a social worker. What the job has provided me with and the areas which I am still lacking in.

How can I learn to be better at my job? How do I reconcile the tough days when I arrive home exhausted with the good days when things fit together? How do we become more confident as a profession to the extent that we don’t need external bodies to ‘speak for us’ and we don’t rely on the morsels that the media throw at us but we can stand among ourselves and have enough confidence to be proud of being social workers without having to claim a need to be like doctors, or nurses, or occupational therapists or teachers.

I see an issue of a lack of professional self-confidence. We are, in the UK, generally, servants of the state and often despised. But we also buy into it and just as I would tell an adolescent that she needs to learn to love and respect herself before anyone else will – so I feel a need to tell our still, in some ways, adolescent profession, that we need to learn to love and respect ourselves – as social workers – before anyone else will.

Regardless of media interviews, regardless of social media campaigns. If we are not advising our children to become social workers, we should work on creating a profession that everyone, including our children, will strive to join.

This is no time to be bashful but before looking outwards for approval, we need to seek it internally – amongst ourselves.

So for those social workers, on World Social Work Day, it’s worth looking on what it is you want to achieve and how being a social worker will help you. And if it won’t, consider what needs to change in the profession for you – for us – to be able to realise our goals.

I love my job. I’m proud to be a social worker. I heartily recommend the profession and anything else I have done has not been as stimulating and challenging. I  have found qualities that I never knew I had and have been able to develop them  but now I see a flailing and unconfident profession.

Not helped in the UK by the bickering over the identity of social work by the professional organisation and the nascent College. My message to BASW would be to listen to your members rather than the Council and treat democracy seriously – while remembering you only represent 13,000 social workers – some of whom are not English (so wouldn’t be part of the College) and some of whom are members for the insurance benefits. You can’t take a unilateral decision and palm it off as ‘democracy’. My message to the SCIE ‘college’ would be to take listening seriously if you want to gain credibility.

As Social Workers we shrive for social justice and providing a voice for those without one. So a College for Social Work needs to consult and provide channels for the voices within the profession that don’t always shout the loudest.

Finally, I’d recommend this post by JaeRan Kim. Watch the videos. And reflect on why we do this and what we need to do to make our profession stronger. It isn’t about colleges and unions and professional organisations (although they all have a place) – it is about self-confidence, a strong moral and ethical compass and strong reflective practice.

Happy World Social Work – I’ll be back at the weekend!

 

NB Tomorrow, The Guardian Local Government Network are having a Q and A session between 12pm – 3pm about achieving a work/life balance in social care. Very topical for World Social Work Day!

Liberating the NHS – some thoughts

There has a lot been written since Lansley announced the new government White Paper on reforms to the NHS called ‘Equity and Excellence : Liberating the NHS’ My hesitation in summarising the points immediately came partly because the thought of another ‘transformational change’ was just about grinding my brain into smithereens. I don’t have enough digits to count the transformations and reconfigurations that have been planned and actioned over the last 10 years of my practice. I haven’t actually read the White Paper – work has been tiring! I have read a few summaries though so that will have to suffice as far as analysis goes until I find some more hours to plug into a day!

In very brief summary, there is talk of GPs taking over the commissioning of care and services in consortia and the abolition of PCTs. Hospitals will be forced to become Foundation Trusts and these Foundation Trusts would be able to lift the limits they currently have on provisions for private patients.

There will be an independent NHS Commissioning Board which will oversee the processes and public health functions will be handed back to the already overstretched (remember the council tax freeze!) local authorities.

More responsibility for the integration of health and social care services will fall back to local authorities and the Financial Times quotes Lansley as claiming that some of the expertise for commissioning mental health services might exist within local authorities saying

There were “sufficient synergies” between mental health and social care for councils to provide “very good support” for mental health commissioning, he said.

The problem is that we can very well assume that there will be little ring-fencing of local authorities already over-stretched budgets. Cuts are coming hard and fast. Supposedly the NHS and health budgets were protected. Local authority budgets are fair game.

Rethink and MIND have both issued statements raising concerns about the expertise that might exist in primary care to commission mental health services.

With Rethink’s press release explaining that

Rethink discovered that only 31% of GPs feel equipped to take on the role for mental health. While three quarters of GPs say they can take responsibility for diabetes and asthma services, less than a third felt the same for mental health services.

Rethink is concerned that unless there’s a national plan to up-skill GPs in mental health many of the 1.5 million people with severe mental illnesses may fail to get the treatment they need.

Meanwhile, Paul Farmer, the Chief Executive of MIND issued a statement saying,

“Transferring powers for commissioning to GPs presents an opportunity for them to develop mental health services that meet local needs and give patients the choice they want.

“However, GPs currently lack the specialist mental health knowledge and training to understand the complexities of mental health commissioning.

“There are already huge variations in the standard and types of mental health care patients receive depending on where they live. For example, access to talking therapies remains patchy, with people waiting months and sometimes years for certain treatments while antidepressant prescribing has soared. Any structural changes must not widen inequalities.

“GPs already have a heavy workload and asking them to add commissioning mental health treatments on to their to do lists will be an extra burden.

“It’s crucial that these new responsibilities don’t cut the amount of time they spend talking to patients.”

I wonder if it will be a case of those who are able to ‘shout loudest’ for their services will be the first to benefit from ‘choice’.

While supposedly this choice will be market-driven, it’s worth looking at the past experience of the  implementation of the ‘care management’ model of social care which was supposed to add purchasing power to social workers and institute a purchaser/provider split between the local authorities and a more extensive range of providers. What the free market managed to do in these circumstances was absolutely gravitate to far fewer choices by larger private companies who were able to drive costs down by employing temporary staff on minimum wages to provide personal care services.

Putting the budgets in the hands of social services teams led to the extension of ‘procurement teams’ who took bids from the private companies and forced the prices (and quality of care, incidently) lower and lower.

Unsurprisingly, these changes make me nervous. Not just because change is so very tiring but it is also costly in terms of consultancy fees.

Dan Parton in the Social Care Blog excellently summarises some of the implications for social care in general and basically finds that there is a span from very little to absolutely nothing mentioned about people with learning disabilities, mental health problems and dementia in the White Paper.

He ventures a guess that possibly these services will be mentioned separately at a later date but it is a very tentative hope. The problem is that the people who use these services are not the ones that the Health Secretary is likely to be thinking will be clamouring to support him.

The Shrink at Lake Cocytus also summarises his response. Again, there is the sense of reconfiguration fatigue that I can absolutely and completely recognise in my own reaction. He extends his fears that the commissioning processes which can be enormously complicated and time consuming will be picked up by large multinational companies who will happily – at a fee – do this job.

The other element packed into the White Paper and mentioned by Community Care is that NICE (National Institute of Clinical Excellence) will be given more powers to ‘drive improvement in social care’. This of course begs the massive question about the position of the current ‘Social Care Institute of Excellence’ and whether will be still actually exist or be consumed by NICE. While SCIE has charitable status and therefore has some independence from the government, if all it’s functions are taken over by NICE – and NICE having further statutory functions – it makes one wonder what might be left of the more distinctive SCIE and whether it is a sign of things to come where social care is marginalised further.

Indeed, SCIE’s response to the White Paper seems a little defensive and nervous

With regard to our future role, as care services minister Paul Burstow has made clear “SCIE … continue to have a role but it won’t be the same role they played directly alongside NICE in the past”. SCIE provides a wide range of services – including supporting the development of quality standards alongside NICE.  As an independent charity we explore innovative approaches to deep-rooted challenges (eg our new approach to serious case reviews in children’s safeguarding). We provide practical, accessible, evidence-based support to frontline care workers through our guides and learning materials, including digital solutions such as Social Care TV. Crucially, we capture and analyse information about latest developments in social care – and share that quickly with the sector (eg our updated guide to personalisation captures the latest developments in how to transform adult care services).

We will work closely with Department of Health and social care organisations to ensure that the personal care and support – as well as the health care – needs of individuals are supported by the reforms within the White Paper. We have the contacts and knowledge needed to ensure this happens.

There is a sense of ‘look, look, we ARE useful – we ARE doing good things’. I think it would be a shame as personally, I’ve found SCIE information very useful.

Indeed, David Brindle, in the Guardian expresses some of these concerns in a piece earlier in the week. , in a piece frighteningly titled ‘Is social care about to be swallowed up by health?’. It’s a look ahead at some of the possibilities that may lie ahead for the social care sector and it doesn’t look rosy.

I can’t say that the investigating some of the details of the White Paper has left me with anything except trepidation and a wish to fight and challenge some of the implications that haven’t been expanded upon yet.  I see it as absolutely crucial that the needs of those with social care needs are not forgotten or left behind through this process.

Interesting times.

Good Practice Framework

My recovery is not as complete as I would have liked it to be at this point and while that means my gradual return to work is still in progress, it also means I have had a chance to explore more information sources than I might have had on my ‘full time’ work schedule.

I came across the Good Practice Framework on the SCIE (Social Care Institute of Excellence) website and have found some very interesting pieces of information there.

Basically, it is a collation of good practice (unsurprising, given the name!)  across adult social care and an explanation of how different projects and schemes have worked – in the hope that this good practice will be able to spread nationally.

I’d suggest anyone interested in social care in the UK have a look through some of the examples in a service area that interests them.

The quality of the write ups of some of the practice examples varies wildly. Some provide very little information apart from ‘we did this well because we consulted service users’ and others go into step by step details about how they implemented the actions – but it is a good source of ideas for things that can be changed sometimes with minimal cost attached.

Generally, it’s a good use of the website though – I think if more comments/discussion could be generated, it could be even more useful.

There are so many networking opportunities now for services and councils to share ideas, it’s a shame not to make use of them. I’m off to get some more ideas about how my ideal service would exist… at zero cost, of course!

Speaking Up

Community Care reports this week on a comment made by Julie Jones, the Chief Executive of SCIE (Social Care Institute of Excellence) compelling social workers to ‘speak up and speak out’ in order to put across their positive messages to counter some of the negativity that the mainstream media and general public seem to hold in regard to the profession.

My general argument (and not just mine) has been that our employers would not welcome direct contact with the press – indeed – we have been instructed to push any media contact request via our press office. This was instilled in us during our initial inductions in the authority and it is hard to shake free from that mindset.

SCIE is positioning itself to be the ‘first point of call for the media’ seeking news stories and sources relating to social work and social care and as such, they are establishing an online TV station particularly devoted to Social Work and Social Care stories. It’s an interesting and potentially useful initiative to use different sources of media to promote positive news as well as training initiatives for the sector.

Conversely though, I can’t help but be marginally concerned by the ‘outing’ of Night Jack – an esteemed anonymous police blogger – whose anonymity was blasted by The Times after a court ruling that the injunction the blogger had taken against the Times revealing his identity could not stand as the judge said

“I do not accept that it is part of the court’s function to protect police officers who are, or think they may be, acting in breach of police disciplinary regulations from coming to the attention of their superiors,” Eady added.

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The implications for anonymous bloggers is obvious – there is no protection in the law. It has served as a short, sharp shock for me anyway.

Nightjack closed his blog, deleted it and has, indeed, been disciplined by his employers.

I try to vary my content between the general and the specific but have no doubt that were someone who works directly with me to come across this site, they would, quite quickly be able to ascertain my identity. I am not as careful as I could be.

For me though, it has provided a wonderful way to bypass the ‘press office’ of the local authority and to speak about the work I do and how I do it in a more direct manner. I hope to provide some insight into social workers who do not necessarily meet the media stereotype. I would argue that writing has improved my practice, knowledge base and effectiveness as certainly, the scope for reflection, thought and comment has increased.

I am torn between being more careful, being less careful and just packing in altogether.  I doubt the ‘packing in altogether’ option would be viable. I am now accustomed to writing, indeed, I missed it when I was on holiday – but to use a tired old cliche, it is food for thought.

I think there is a place for anonymous blogging – and although I have to say, I never expected there to be much protection as anonymity is and can be very fragile, the Nightjack lesson shown to prove how much more careful it is necessary to be.