Weekly Social Work Links 30

As the days become more distinctly autumnal, I’m sharing some interesting links I’ve come across over the last week. As always feel free to share any other links you find that are related or interesting in the comments section.

I’m always wanting to find new blogs that are related to social work internationally so if you find one I haven’t noticed again, please leave a link!

Firstly, another plug for This Week in Mentalists – a now-traditional weekly round up of mental health related posts from which I stole my inspiration for these round up posts. Essential weekly reading for me and for all those who have an interest in mental health.

Indeed, it was through This Week in Mentalists that I came across the wonderful new blog ‘Veruca Salt’ who works in a CAMHS (Children and Adolescent Mental Health Service) Team and in which she discusses anger management. Rang a lot of bells with me. I really look forward to following her blog which she suggests in her byline, will share ‘views on children and adolescent mental health’.

Keep writing, Veruca, I think this one will be a corker!

I also came across this post on Blogher which is written by someone who worked as a social worker. The title says it all really ‘The Problem with handing out the Happy Pills’. She raises some excellent and thoughtful points about medication.

Social Work Soldier – another new blog I’ve recently found, shares her thoughts on her first weeks in a new job.

While Social Worker Mom looks for a new job.

And as the author of From Media to Social Work gets ready to embark on her course, she shares her thoughts of the shadowing experiences she has had over the summer.

The Masked AMHP shares part one of his ‘genesis’ story or how he got into social work. It’s a fantastic post!

On a related subject the Social Work Career Development shares some motivational quotes and asks for more examples from readers.

Social Worker in the South meanwhile shares a moving story which indicates the importance of this line of work.

and Going Mental explains that sometimes ‘the system’ works.

On Eyes Open Wider, meanwhile, some reflection and thoughts on what the innate sadness in some of the work that is done.

The Modern Social Worker shares a post about Eugenics, Race and a woman’s right to choose. Perhaps particularly timely as the abortion debate ranks up here in the UK.

SocialJerk has some fine posts as always including this one about the paranoias that exist about adults working with children and some of the absurdities that have arisen around these paranoias.

Community Care’s Social Work Blog has a post about a ‘game’ developed by the University of Kent to assist in training around child protection practice through the use of scenarios (I haven’t actually tried the game but would be interested to hear from anyone who has)

Nechakogal’s blog shares some relevant (and freely accessible) research on different subjects,  which is worth checking out. I’m a great fan of open access for research and papers.

How Not to Do Social Work shares his variation on ‘What I did in my Summer Holidays’ post with typical thoughtfulness.

One a completely different note, A Social Worker’s View draws our attention to Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

And The New Social Worker Online Blog considers the impact on endometriosis.

The Social Work Tech Blog has a fantastically detailed ‘how to’ post about using technology to ‘observe’ sessions and to learn from them.

Finally congratulations to Gamer Therapists who has published a book on Video Games and Psychotherapy.

Online Learning and Social Work – A proposal

I’m on a theme at the moment so run with me. I have through various conversations that I’ve hooked into among Occupational Therapists come across this programme OT4OT (Online Technology for Occupational Therapists)

"Make a photograph... [@dailyshoot #ds134]

 

connectlrmeli @ Flickr

It is a proposed, international educational programme using occupational therapists internationally to provide and support web-based learning or as they call it a ‘virtual exchange schedule’ to promote learning and understanding and uses of technology to grow international knowledge about occupational therapy internationally.

It’s a fantastic model but I’m desperately jealous. Where is the social work equivalent? How about an international ‘virtual exchange schedule’ of free programming that social workers internationally can both contribute to and participate in? Why do we leave these things to those who organise and charge fees which are too large for individual interested practitioners to attend?

I’d love to find out more about this model and see if there’s a way of pursuing a similar experience in social work internationally but I’d need people to come on board. Is there anyone firstly who would contribute their expertise to run virtual sessions or discussion groups throughout a ‘day’. Any social work departments willing to help with technology aspects and providing an educational ‘oversight’ to the quality of submissions? The idea would be for an international event to broaden international experiences of social work. I think it could be a fantastic resource and opportunity.

An opportunity for ‘people like me’ who are not linked directly to universities to run ‘events’ online, it could also be an opportunity for those who teach to share some of their information globally and gain experience and exposure of running online events.

I need to do a bit of work behind the scenes regarding technical aspects and how that  might work but I don’t think it needs to be complicated.

Anyone interested? I can put together some kind of mailing list or group on Google to discuss further. I just want to know if I’m shooting into the wind or not!   I’ll do a bit of investigating regarding hosting and technological needs over the weekend and will write up posts as I find out information. I think it could be something really exciting.

(just as an aside – wouldn’t it be a wonderful world if this was something our ‘College of Social Work’ or BASW were to put together without nudging – that’s the kind of innovation and progressive thinking I’d like to see from a professional association rather than messing around and replicating unions that already exist).

Life as a Social Work Student 4 – The Half Way Point

This is a guest post from the student who has contributed since before her course started. She first wrote here about her pre-course shadowing experiences, her initial impressions after a few months on the course,  the start of her first placement and the midpoint of her first placement. Here, we join her at the end of her first year of the Masters. 

Again, I’m very grateful to her for contributing, especially as she now has her own blog here – and she’s round and about on Twitter.

One Down, One to Go

As I write this, I’ve just received the official results of my first
year on the Social Work Masters course, which is that:
“You have successfully completed your studies this academic year and can progress to the next year of your studies.”

That one short sentence summarises all the various essays, lectures, seminars, placement work and portfolio, and dissertation proposal into a single pass/ fail. I am proud of the pass, I feel I had to jump through a lot of hoops to get it and I hope I’ve done so with a general good grace. I’m also proud of having written academic essays for the first time in my life and having learned to do it well enough to get a pass at masters level.

I think it’s a truism of any kind of training, whether academic or job-based, that you never feel that you get enough feedback. A sentence or two on an essay that took weeks of stress, reading, and planning can seem a bit sparse. It’s not that I even know what feedback I’d want, maybe just a chance to explain why I did the non-optimal thing, or why the references list may look a bit thin. At college it’s particularly odd because we have to give feedback on the courses as well, usually at a point where you’re pleased to have got to the end of the course so will give it a good mark purely for that. Or maybe that’s just me, I think some of my fellow students are far more critical.

Truth is, I have been generally happy with the standard of teaching. I have learned a lot over the past year, and picked up new skills as well. I can’t judge how relevant or useful any of these will be, except that I felt confident in finding appropriate theory books to back up my extended case study on placement and when I started the course I don’t think I would even have known which part of the library to search.

In any case, now is the calm before the storm of the second year, final placement, dissertation, job hunt, and things in general getting more serious. I really have no idea what the job situation will be like when I’m searching properly next year, I just know that I have a few backup ideas in mind and am not planning to put all my eggs in the statutory sector basket.

Some of my cohort are working through the summer ‘vacation’ which is a great opportunity to get more experience. I’m fortunate in that I get more of a break which I am very much appreciating. Next month I plan to spend more time down at the library making a start on scoping out the dissertation. Meanwhile I’m discussing a possible second placement with a placement agency that looks very hopeful (read: it’s perfect, but just need to sort out whether it’s practical or not due to travel issues.)

And hopefully I won’t have forgotten everything from last year when September rolls around.

Making Adult Social Care Better 1

I think I’m fairly good at griping and raising ‘problems’. For the next week, I want to try and take a positive approach and look at solutions as well as problems.

A few conversations I’ve had over the past week have focused on what is wrong with adult social work and mental health social work at the moment but more importantly what can be done to make things better.

My frustration is that for all the discussions that take place in the sector, so few seem to focus on those of us who have worked and are working at the so-called ‘front-line’. A home carer knows about the ways that contracts have been managed and awarded at the lowest cost and they will be able to tell you with far more insight than any contracting manager about the effects of 15 minute ‘spot’ visits and the lack of dignity present in the care for older people. They would also be able to give you an amalgam of ideas which branch from consideration, knowledge and experience of a wide range of service users.

Are employed home care workers ever invited to discussion forums and debates about the future of care? No. But you know, maybe the feedback would be the most valuable.

On a more personal level it feels as if the conversations about service design and delivery take place around and above us – with us being the people at the front line of support. Yes, there are discussions  with service users and carers but how much effort is made to seek out opinions that do not fit in the model that the consultants want them to express? How many of the people who attend these meetings, discussions and debates become self-selecting.

If you create a service user group, for example, in a particular borough, it seems to me obvious that you are most likely to engage will be those whose voices are already heard through different means.

I like to set myself up as some kind of advocate in terms of having an understanding of the needs of people who don’t often have their voices heard in these kinds of meetings and debates because the discussions I have are mostly with people who are at their lowest ebbs on the scale of health and need.

For me, it is crucially important that these people are not left behind by commissioners and service design but my experience and understanding of the sector suggests that they are.

I don’t want to keep harking back to the roll out of personal budgets on the back of the model of direct payments but I will. The voices of those without support and without advocates are understandably quieter and the way that the services have been designed focuses quite rightly on choice but what is not present is a way for an equitable service to be delivered to those who aren’t for some reason able to express choice.

So things that can make things better

– Use of advocates in a more formalised manner throughout the system. Volunteer advocates have a role but I see more mileage in professional advocacy with extensive investment in non-directed advocacy as that is potentially where the greatest need lies. If I weren’t so tied to my job in terms of needing a salary to pay the bills, I would, at a flash, try to establish some kind of enterprise to focus specifically on support planning and advocacy for adults with dementias. I hope there is a role for independent social work in this area in the future – in the meantime, if anyone wants to jump on my idea and run with it, I am happily ‘open sourcing’ it.

– involving front line practitioners in conversations, debates and discussions with the local authorities relinquishing some of the reins of power in respect to conversation. Recognise our professional vigour and competence. We see people and have discussions with people that will never attend forums collectively. We can signpost and support commissioners and contracting officers but we are never asked and never given the time to think more creatively outside our little boxes of control. We have ideas and a happier, more connected workforce is an engaged and interested one.

– speak to home care workers too – those with agencies and where in-house services still exist, with them. They will have good ideas about the ways that their services are failing.

– home visits to facilitate discussions – why have all meetings in a central hall when it can be limiting regarding those who have greater physical and mental health needs.

Technology can facilitate greater conversation and communication with two-way flows but face to face discussion is still very important as technology and keyboards can alienate some people – perhaps exactly those people whom it is most important to connect with.

-Practitioners have to be more engaged with developments in the sector and unfortunately I don’t see BASW or the embryonic College of Social Work being particularly engaged with social workers. Why have social workers become so disengaged from professional organisations and unions? Is it to do with a fear of employers? I think some more group action could really build the strength of social work but it is hard to shrug off the feeling that we are a disengaged and disenfranchised profession that like to feel sorry for our collective selves and wallow in our diminished status. I think if we took a stronger political stance and stood up to our employers and their political agendas and displayed more independence of thought, we would be able to demand more respect.

I have decided that while I can moan and groan with the best of ‘em, coming together with ideas for improvement is by far the best way of making our voices heard.

Power, Status and Professionalism

power. to protect.

 

kenyee@flickr

I was ruminating over the post I wrote yesterday about the interplay and interaction between being a social worker and being a foster carer and the one aspect that played on my mind was the differential in ‘status’.

I used to think status and professional status was very important to me as a social worker. Don’t get me wrong. I’m very proud to be a social worker but I think when I was first qualified, I was also proud to be doing ‘something proper’ and recognised.

I had, at this point, in my defence, worked for years in the care sector as a support worker and a care worker. I had had friends and family asking me when I was going to get a ‘proper’ job and tell me that my academic qualifications were ‘underused’ in a minimum wage care job.

And I listened. I began to believe. The process towards my professionalisation was one I was proud of. Sometimes if you do a ‘low status’ job or have no job, society makes assumptions about your general intelligence level so being able to prove that I could make it through a postgraduate course was also an element of pride for me. I liked the idea of ‘having a profession’.

But I wonder if I was too taken by status and if the divides and gaping holes that exist between policy makers and practitioners is because ‘status’ is a bar.

For example, yesterday I had an extensive conversation with the Personal Budgets Implementation Manager about a case I was working on. We made good progress on hopefully working on a more creative option for a service user I’m working with currently.

My colleagues were surprised that a) I had approached this ‘manager’ directly and b) that she  had listened.

I thought about this and my role in perpetuating the divides between policy and practice and how status remains such a predominant factor in blocking conversations from the ‘front line’ to ‘management’.

We are institutionalised both by our employers who determine that ‘conversation’ flows in one direction and by our society where we, as a species seem to be keen to label everything, put labels on everything and want to by our nature, know our place in the societal pyramids of power.

So back now to the foster carer and the social worker. Is the foster carer really on a ‘lower’ rung of the ladder of professionalism than the social worker that they can be ‘looked down on’ by so-called professionals? It can honestly feel that way and taking a step back to look at the way I am ‘dealt’ with when I have my ‘social worker’ hat on as opposed to when I introduce and describe myself as a ‘foster care’ is a glimpse into the different statuses that it is accorded.

Status is afforded because power is present and this is something that overrides the social work profession in whatever capacity it is undertaken. Whether it is in adult care management where it can feel as a practitioner that you are pretty reined in in terms of what care can be provided on financial levels, in the eyes of the service user you are the ‘gatekeeper’ to the mythical goal of ‘provision of care services’.

In Mental Health work there are some obvious legal powers under the Mental Health Act but even in day to day care co-ordination, you become the conduit between the multidisciplinary team and the service user. You decide what is important to feed back, what constitutes a concern or a worry and how situations may be resolved or, if necessary escalated.

And we go into people’s homes. We make appointments. We decide on timings to fit into our busy diaries. Sometimes we even cancel appointments. These are all displays of power. Power isn’t about flexing of muscles, it can be as much about sending a letter or making a phone call suggesting a time to visit. Of course, it has to exist but the important thing is never to forget the power differentials and the way that they change the dynamics between user and provider.

With my last social work student, we spoke a lot about power and I alluded that she should reflect on the power relationship between us as well as the power relationship with service users. I smile and I joke with her but there is an enormous power differential between us that cannot go unacknowledged.

And as a foster carer, I accept that social workers will turn up at any point to see the child I have in placement or to just see the home or to check up on us. That’s fine, it’s understandable and I have no problem whatsoever with that, I know it’s a part of the process and I would feel angry if foster carers were not subject to checks but there is a power differential there and it has to be acknowledged  – even if it is not openly acknowledged.

We can never have an truly equitable ‘status’ because social workers can come and check on me and are responsible for my approval as a foster carer but I can’t wander into their home or even office at will (trust me, I wouldn’t want to!).  I think without acknowledging this power differential or by pretending there is any kind of ‘equal’ status we do both parties a disservice.

Once acknowleged, issues of power can be addressed and considered but if it remains unspoken, they can be levered and used for less positive outcomes and ends.

As for ‘professionalism’ in social work, I think we could go round in circles with this one. Respect is helpful but that is a truism that can pretty much be applied to any sphere of life. Is the respect based on professionalism? Only if the professional is respectful and competent.   An incompetent professional can do far more damage than good and the converse is true for a good professional.

Thinking back to the stories of abuse at Winterbourne View,  we see much more obvious displays of power. The power was held by the care workers and exercised on the patients at Winterbourne. There is something within the care sector where so  much work is done with some who for many reasons may have little power that it can attract people who want to exercise power for the wrong reasons – to augment feelings of self-worth or to bolster failings in other areas of their lives. It is important that the power dynamic is acknowledged and guarded against at all levels and that it never ever becomes something that is taken for granted or played on to make others feel threatened or denigrated.

The status, the qualification, the experience and the practice alone don’t make a ‘good professional’ – it is a mixture of all of them and the way that power is used, acknowledged (internally) and processed that create good practice and good practitioners.

We can often talk about qualities that are important for good social workers and social care workers. I wonder if I’ve mentioned it but for the reasons above, I would put the quality of humility very high. We need to listen and be aware of the inherent power we have. We need to ensure the voices we hear are echoed upwards in our chains of ‘command’. We need to listen to experts of their own situation and the people close to them. Sometimes we have to impose and sometimes we have to say no, but we acting with humility is a rich and exceptional quality and one that makes a good social worker.

My First Social Work Job

Czytelnia Humanistyczna BUR

Image via Wikipedia

I can’t quite remember my first day in my first job as a qualified social worker. I’m trying to think back. I remember a few things though and as university courses come to their ends and thoughts turn to employment, I considered thinking back to that time when I was pushed forward from my training into the world of ‘real’ social work.

Finding employment hadn’t been an issue. At that time, we had kind of mini-careers fairs and events in the university where employers mainly neighbouring local authorities and agencies would try to tempt us to join them. Some offered golden handshakes in cash terms and others endless support.

Later, in a different job at a different time, one of our managers remarked how at that point, all you had to do was sit on a street corner with your DipSW (or MA or BA) in Social Work and you would have people come up to you and offer you a job. Perhaps it wasn’t as much of an overstatement as we thought.

I went with a social work agency. My closest friends from the course – in fact, the only ones I’m still in touch with now – both took local authority jobs in neighbouring (different) boroughs – one in a Child Protection team and the other in a Leaving Care team. I knew I wanted to work in adults’ services. I’d known from before the course started. I wasn’t so anchored as to which part of adult services I worked in. I was open to anything.

I met with the agency consultant and we spoke about what I wanted in a job and how far I’d be willing to travel. About a week later, he came back with two posts available and both were in older adults services. As that had been where my ‘statutory’ placement was, I was more than happy as I felt I had a little understanding and experience in that area. I interviewed at both places and chose the borough which was nearer to me with the added bonus that I knew a few people in the team already as they had been seconded onto the same social work course as me as ‘workplace based students’. Even one or two familiar faces in a large office was enough of a draw.

It was a large office and I had no experience apart from my placement, in a social services department. In some ways, I felt more than a little out of my depth but the team was kind and friendly. It also seemed to be staffed by about 50% of agency workers. I had heard rumours of prejudices against agency staff due to the differentials in the salaries  but honestly, I never really experienced that. I didn’t pretend to be anything I wasn’t.

If anything, I noticed more of a tension between ‘qualified’ and ‘unqualified’ staff than ‘agency’ and ‘permanent’ because a lot of the care management work we did was generic and especially when I was starting out, I was taking cases with less complexity than the more experienced ‘unqualified’ staff who would be getting stuck in.

In general though the unity of experience was greater than the division of types and salaries. The team as a whole could not have been friendlier or more welcoming. I was able to attend all the training courses provided, despite being ‘agency’. There was no differentiation in the type of supervision I received nor the inclusiveness I felt. Looking back, I realise that perhaps I was lucky but I worked with and among many people that I had and have the utmost respect for.

I would be afraid, at times, to ask the stupid questions. Where do I find this form? How do I find this file? How do I contact about this? What do I do when subjected to a hearty rant? Can I help this person get this service?

It seems like a different world now. Before FACS. Before any kind of charging policies. When we still met needs that would later be classified as ‘low’.

We didn’t type much. I shared a PC with the person next to me and we had to take it in turns to write reports or arrange visits with each other so we weren’t in at the same time – both wanting to use a computer. Along with our carefully designed care schedules, we had to provide costings for every service provided ourselves on spreadsheets either completed by hand or for the more techno-friendly, on PC.  Later it all got fed into central databases and spreadsheets so the figures would automatically be adjusted but there wasn’t a desk at that time, without a big desk calculator on it.

I think my memories have been shaded with a little rose tinge at times. I remember a lot of anxieties about covering duty and wondering what would turn up. This was before the single access points and call centre type offices existed to ‘screen’ calls or distribute them appropriately so we had calls from everything about loose dogs on the streets to people who hadn’t seen their elderly neighbours for a few days and were worried. Some entirely appropriate and some.. more creative.

I don’t miss those days though. It was a different way of working and a good base. There were some very good people I worked with. It was an ‘older’ team. I was immediately the youngest qualified worker in the team when I joined. I think that made it easier for me to ask questions. I learnt that the most important thing is to ask and not assume and that old chestnut about there being no such thing as a stupid question never felt more true.

Did the university prepare me for the work I was doing? A little but it was the start and  not the end. I have never stopped learning since then and I have a long, long way to go.

I realised that the lecturers at the time were teaching us about a social work system that had existed when they had been practitioners, about 10 years previously. I realised that the time pressures between being a student on placement and a qualified member of staff employed and paid were exponentially different.

There were problems and difficulties. I still remember some of the distress I felt when the first service user that I had worked with extensively, died. I remember the fear of my first manager and some of the bullying tactics she employed on the staff under her.

I had dreams at that point (I still do now, but very different ones). I wanted to travel the world. I felt I had a lot still to do. I vowed to myself I didn’t want to turn into the older staff that I’d seen there, plugging away after 10, 20, 30 years in the same post and becoming insular and self-absorbed.

Those thoughts pushed me to save up and leave after a year. I did go off and see the world and do many different things. I realised I missed the work, mostly I missed working in social care and I missed, well, I missed home.

I came back to the UK, a couple of years later, I was lucky enough to still be able to walk into a social work job and I knew it was exactly where I wanted to be and what I wanted to do for the rest of my career.

Things have changed a whole lot and some things are a lot better.

I’ll continue with my story at another point when I got back to the UK to find new legislation, systems, agencies and.. everyone not only had their own PC but they were expected to use it!

To be continued..