Perspectives, Students and Ageing

I enjoy having students around. It helps keep me fresh and enthusiastic and to see my job through the eyes of someone coming into it rather than through the occasionally blurred eyes of someone who has been working for a while.

I had a student shadowing me for a period yesterday. It was a  fairly standard visit as far as my work goes. The person we went to see (who I’ll call Mrs J) was someone I’ve been working with for a few years. While I endeavour to do my best in every aspect of my work, I can’t deny that Mrs J  is someone I have a soft spot for.

I started working with her about three years ago and to say she is isolated is an understatement. For obvious reasons I can’t go into the details but suffice to say since my first encounter with her we have both come a long way. She has had a lengthy compulsory hospital admission during this period and has lived in three different flats (and two different hospitals) in that time. She is now living in a beautiful flat and has a secure tenancy. She is ‘settled’ for the first time in many many years.  She even has a fairly interesting personal budget to pay for a support worker.

I thought it was quite a good visit. We got through a lot of things that needed to be done and things that needed to be discussed.

As we left the student said to me how sad she felt after the visit. She asked me if all the visits I made were that ‘depressing’ and wondered if I worried about ‘getting old’.

It took me by surprise because I thought it had been quite a positive visit and wasn’t feeling remotely ‘depressed’. Then I remembered the perspective I had and the perspective she has. She doesn’t know, apart from the words that I filled her in with, where my ‘starting point’ with Mrs J was. I can explain and expand but it isn’t the same. My ‘starting point’ needs to change and as long as I consider where Mrs J was three years ago, I wonder if I am becoming complacent about the further routes to enrichment and recovery in her life.

It made me think about the way that new eyes can improve the work that I do and shatter some of that selfsame complacency. I shouldn’t look at where I am now necessarily in the context of where we’ve been but rather where we are going.

As for the sadness in my work, I don’t feel it. I feel it some days and in some situations, of course. It’s hard not to and a part of compassion is empathy but I remember a conversation I had a few years ago when I wasn’t long in the job with a colleague who reminded me, while I was expressing my own concerns about age in general, that we only see a small proportion of the population and to constantly remind myself that most people age well. I try to remember that. I wonder if that is one of the reason for prejudice against older people and a lack of respect in the care system.  We just don’t like being reminded of the fact that we will get old. It personalises the work in a way that working in other areas of social work might not. We all hope to grow old. We owe it to those we work with and for to provide the most assistance and to make what can be the unpleasant task of ‘dealing’ with public services as painless and as accessible as possible.

Food for thought.

What does a Mental Health Social Worker do?

I think there’s a lot of misunderstandings about what I actually do at work. What do social workers who are in mental health services do? What do social workers who work in adult services do?

I hope by reading, some people get to learn a little of my day to day role but I also thought it might be useful to set it out more explicitly.

I’ve worked in adult services and I’ve worked, as I do now, in mental health services but I’ve never worked in childrens’ services so I can’t comment at all about the work that is done there. This is my attempt, not to explain social work as a whole, but to explain the bit of social work that I’m familiar with.

I work in a multidisciplinary Community Mental Health Team. We have a consultant psychiatrist attached to the team as well as a few (the amount fluctuates!) other doctors. We have occupational therapists, clinical psychologists, assistant psychologists, community psychiatric nurses and of course, social workers. We always seem to have students around, whether psychology trainees, OT students, nursing students or social work students (and even some medical students pop in occasionally).  I sit opposite a psychologist and between an OT and a nurse.

Although no week is typical, I’ll give a few examples both of the generic role and the way that social work fits into a mental health setting, in England, at least (because I’m not sure if there are differences in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland).

Work is allocated for ‘care co-ordination’. Care co-ordination is akin to what we would have called ‘care management’ in Adult Services although there are some differences and responsibilities under the Care Programme Approach.  It basically means we take responsibility as a kind of ‘key worker’ for individuals who are ‘taken on’ by our service.

Allocation should be done on the basis of appropriate professional expertise so for some issues that have a more ‘social work’ tilt about dynamics, organising personal budgets or residential placements might be preferred as allocated to social workers, some that are more rehabilitation orientated might be allocated to an Occupational Therapist and more medical or medication management might be allocated to a CPN but that is a very broad brush to paint and in practice – most people are a mixture of all the different needs and so are allocated generically. If I have need a of specific OT assessment for one of the people that I am care coordinating, I will ask one of our OTs and similarly, I care coordinate one person who receives a monthly depot injection from one of my nursing colleagues.

So what is care coordination/care management about? Well, we start by working with and on a care plan and this should be led by the user of the service. If there is a carer involved it would also involve them and we put together plans. In my service which works predominantly with older adults, there may well be care services needed and this is now all delivered through personal budgets so I would take someone through the supported self assessment questionnaire, the resource allocation system and develop with them and/or their carers, depending on capacity issues on a support plan and way that services would be delivered. This would be reviewed and implemented in partnership.

I will also arrange respite placements  and services when they are needed and review services as they are delivered.

Alongside this, I would also be responsible for monitoring any changes in mental state and might provide some brief therapeutic interventions mainly through basic CBT type models according to additional training which has been given in the NHS Trust I work in as they are trying to ‘skill up’ all care coordinators!  When I meet with someone, my discussion ranges for more broadly than about their care needs specifically. Sometimes it is about sourcing and finding ideas, services and people that might be able to help, namely through group work which is run across the service or through referrals to specific psychologists attached to the team. Sometimes it is much more difficulty to quantify – and log – and record.

I work with carers and work through carers’ assessments and services such as they are. Often I feel one of the most important aspects of my work is carer support as we rely so heavily on some carers. I might liaise with different organisations on peoples’ behalf if they can’t manage or need some assistance. Sometimes I help with Attendance Allowance or Disability Living Allowance claims but there are council teams that do that so it would only be in circumstances when I might know someone particularly well and be concerned that someone who doesn’t know them that well might ‘underplay’ some of their needs.

Sometimes it is about liaising with creditors, gas and electricity companies, housing etc with various degrees of success. I like to think of myself as an advocate at times.

Although at times, I am very far from an advocate. I am subject to specific ‘terms of reference’ of my job and have no control over things like budgets that can be assigned to various people with various needs. I would ‘present’ the needs of service users I work with to various internal funding panels so on that basis I need to advocate clearly.

We have to review the services that are in place regularly. I would attend meetings at day hospitals and on wards when I am allocated to people who currently attend or are inpatients.

I work to plan and organise discharges from hospitals both the psychiatric hospitals and the general hospitals when people whom I am allocated to are inpatients. There are some very obvious time limitations on these pieces of work and no-one wants anyone to be in hospital any longer than they have to – but equally no-one wants someone to be discharged from hospital before they are well enough to be – which is another very important consideration.

I conduct safeguarding investigations as well. Alerts come up with what can be surprising frequency and there are prescribed procedures through which we approach these investigations. It’s hard to generalise as they can be very different. Interestingly most of my recent ones have involved residential services in some way or another. I think I’ll come back to the process of investigating abuse in another post as it is altogether a subject in its own right. We tend to get more of these investigations in older adults services than occur in the working age adult services.

I am an Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP). That means that I am on a rota to carry out Mental Health Act (MHA) Assessments . There is an important difference between a Mental Health Assessment which is a more generic term for an assessment of someone’s mental health and a specific ‘Mental Health Act Assessment’ which is a formal assessment under the 1983 Mental Health Act which can result in a compulsory admission to hospital without consent.

The role of the AMHP could be a post all of its own and it probably should be so I’ll condense here for clarity because it has increasingly become a part of my day to day role. I organise and arrange these assessments by arranging for ambulance service and doctors attendance (there have to be two medical recommendations written by doctors – one should know the patient (usually their own psychiatrist or GP along with an independent doctor who has had additional training). I also attend a magistrates’ court to obtain a warrant to enter if it is likely that we would not be allowed access to a property. I  arrange police support if necessary and would also organise a hospital bed if necessary.

There are legal forms to complete and I have an obligation to be mindful and respectful of legal rights and human rights when involved in these processes.  I am obliged to attend a specified amount of ‘legal updates’ every year to maintain my approval as an AMHP and every five years I have to be ‘reapproved’ which involved me taking a legal test and submitting some reflective pieces and examples of my work as well as carrying out a set number of assessments per year (no problem with the numbers – I’ve done the requisite annual number in the past week!).

I’m also a BIA (Best Interests Assessor). This means I have specific duties and responsibilities to carry out assessments under the ‘Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards’. Again, that probably demands a post or two of its own. Suffice to say that every so often I am called out to do a specific type of assessment on this basis.  I had to attend additional training to be able to do this and have to attend update workshops and training to retain my approval.

Apart from the things I’ve listed, my job involves other pieces of work. I write social circumstances reports for tribunals. I occasionally have been involved in assessments and writing reports for Guardianships and in taking part in the process of approving or extending a Community Treatment Orders. I frequently carry out Capacity Assessments for various reasons.

I’m a practice assessor too so when I have a student, well, I have a student to supervise. I tend to enjoy having students around. It does create more work though and there’s no recompense in terms of reduction of caseloads! And the universities and local authorities wonder why we can’t offer as many statutory placements!

My work is often one of juggling and trying to prioritise and reprioritise on the basis of risk management. What is more important for me to complete on any given day.

I haven’t even mentioned data input or writing case notes but takes a fair bit of time. We have regular audits of our ‘productivity’ – we have to input our ‘outcome measures’ and re-input them regularly so our management overlords accept that we are actually spending our time at work, working effectively and not just twiddling our thumbs and playing Facebook games.

The amount that we have to ‘report back’ is, of course, growing at an exponential rate.

So that is my job – as briefly as I could manage and I have missed out some of the million subtleties that might change on a day to day basis.

I generally enjoy it. I love the variety that is thrown my way on any given day. Some days it frustrates me and there are rarely enough hours in the day to get what I want done, done. This may explain some of my frustration with the bodies who all say they ‘speak for social work’.  Have they explained the role of social work outside child protection? Would you know, if you are not involved in the ‘system’ what a mental  health social worker actually does?

But really, that’s another fight for another day. For now, well, I need to go to work!

But I had over to you, dear reader. Is there anything that surprises you? What you expect? What have I left out – as I’m sure I have missed a lot of things!

Winterbourne View – Where were the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards?

One of the many things that have been concerning me since the Panorama programme about abuse within the Winterbourne View hospital for adults with learning disabilities was aired was the way that the safeguards implemented under the Mental Capacity Act were, or weren’t used.

Bearing in mind that a number of the patients/residents would have been formally detained under the Mental Health Act, that still leaves some that surely should/would/might have been subject to the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.

Law books 2

Eric E Johnson @ Flickr

On The Small Places, Lucy, in a fantastic post that breaks down a lot of the issues, writes on this matter stating

Undoubtedly everyone on that ward was deprived of their liberty, but were they detained under the provisions of the Mental Health Act, the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, or just unlawfully detained?  It’s not a question that’s taken up, but from a legal perspective it’s very important.  If they were unlawfully detained, police should look at charges of false imprisonment on top of other charges relating to assaults and neglect.  If they were detained under the DoLS, who wrote the assessment that detention was in their best interests?  Did they place conditions upon the detention, and ensure they were upheld?  Was this assessment lawful, or should families be looking at issuing proceedings for unlawful detention against those who commissioned the care?

We don’t have answers to this question and I’m going to wander into the realms of supposition and guesswork with little apology, after all, I am no journalist.

I am going to presume that there was a poor use of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards – and I make this assumption based on the following grounds.

Firstly, there is a very poor understanding and implementation of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLs).  I am a  practising Best Interests Assessor and a a social worker in a team that is primarily responsible for older adult. I go to a lot of residential and nursing homes. I go to a lot of hospitals. I observe and sometimes I assess. I have seen poor implementation and understanding in my own experience and can’t even begin to count the errors in the knowledge of the basic  tenets of the DoLs procedure that managing authorities (residential homes, nursing homes and hospitals) have. It’s a job to explain to colleagues as well.

This isn’t necessarily through lack of training, although sometimes it is merely about the speed of turnover – the staff that were trained are no longer in situ,  but it is also about a way that the safeguards are perceived. It’s also because all the training was done prior to the safeguards ‘going live’ to ensure the procedures were in place  but there have been changes through case law and through practice so professionals are lagging behind on the legal procedural knowledge and with training budgets cut, it can led to dangerous and unlawful practice.

Managing authorities are generally  (not exclusively) reluctant to trigger them because somehow they see it as bringing more attention to the ways the organisation operates or they see it as some kind of criticism for the way that they manage care. It may be or it may not be. If there is a deprivation of liberty there needs to be a legal framework in which it operates.

I’d venture to say that everyone at every level in every residential care facility needs to have an understanding and knowledge of the law and the way it relates to people who lack capacity to make certain decisions. I wonder what understanding those who assaulted patients in Winterbourne had of the law.

Any number of times  I have been told that a managing authority will request an authorisation after a review or when the social worker tells them to which, in itself, shows a misunderstanding of the legislation which requires immediate action and requests for assessments as soon as (or actually prior to) a deprivation of liberty takes place.

With the issue of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards and the Mental Capacity Act more generally come the role of advocates. Independent Mental Capacity Advocates have a statutory role within the Mental Capacity Act just as Independent Mental Health Advocates have a role under the Mental Health Act. Were there any advocates involved with the patients at Winterbourne? If so were they given the access which is allowed legally?

I genuinely believe that alongside criticism of the CQC which I will probably save for another post, it’s worth looking at the role of advocates and the potential that they could have to prevent abuse and to protect people who are vulnerable to abuse. I wonder if there should be a more robust system of advocacy in place (hint – yes, I think there should) to monitor placements from the basis of each resident. Cost? Why, yes, it would. And therein lies the rub but in any discussion of improvement, I think the role of an independent advocate looms large.

So why didn’t the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, safeguard the patients at Winterbourne View?

My own supposition is because they were completely ignored and not used.

What might a Best Interests Assessor have discovered that a CQC inspector couldn’t? Well, each resident affected would have had to be interviewed, as would staff members and family members. Deceptive staff members and frightened residents would still have been respectively deceptive and frightened but additional questioning and listening could have potentially led to a breakthrough. There would have been an examination of care plans and methods (although as we discussed in the office last week – any home can present a beautifully person centred care plan on paper – it’s a matter of implementation) and there would have potentially been a route in for more ‘relevant persons’ representatives’ to visit and ensure the well-being of the person being ‘deprived of their liberty’.

In a sense, I do wonder how many other ‘Winterbourne Views’ there are out there. I think while the culture of the organisations and the role of power needs to be examined, there also has to be an understanding of the law as it stands and whether safeguards were used  – if they were, why didn’t they safeguard? and if they weren’t (which is my suspicion) why weren’t they? Surely that is for the management (and the government agencies which monitor the legislation) to answer.

Eligibility, Birmingham and Cuts

Birmingham was the first English town without ...

Image via Wikipedia

While awaiting the details of the court judgement, there was an important ruling yesterday that Birmingham Council’s attempt to limit eligibility to social care services to those who have ‘critical’ care needs is unlawful.

Drawing out some of the definitions to what this actually means and could mean requires a look at the details of those who brought the case to court.

There were four defendents which the BBC explains include

a 65-year-old woman with severe learning difficulties who receives 24-hour care in a home paid for by the council

25-year-old man with a rare genetic disorder and severe learning disabilities who receives overnight respite care, also funded by the council

30-year-old deaf, autistic man with severe learning disabilities who is prone to self-harm. His specialist day care would also have gone under the plans

and

a 36-year-old woman with severe learning difficulties whose day care centre will close and who is also set to lose respite care

It’s useful to go back to the definitions of what ‘critical’ and ‘substantial’ needs are to understand fully the implications of councils moving the eligibility criteria from one stage to the next.

Critical needs exist where –

• life is, or will be, threatened; and/or
• significant health problems have developed or will develop; and/or
• there is, or will be, little or no choice and control over vital aspects of the immediate environment; and/or
• serious abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
• there is, or will be, an inability to carry out vital personal care or domestic routines; and/or
• vital involvement in work, education or learning cannot or will not be sustained; and/or
• vital social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be sustained; and/or
• vital family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will not be undertaken

Whereas Substantial needs (those that Birmingham are stating they are no longer able to meet) exist where –

• there is, or will be, only partial choice and control over the immediate environment; and/or
• abuse or neglect has occurred or will occur; and/or
• there is, or will be, an inability to carry out the majority of personal care or domestic routines;
and/or
• involvement in many aspects of work, education or learning cannot or will not be sustained;
and/or
• the majority of social support systems and relationships cannot or will not be sustained; and/or
• the majority of family and other social roles and responsibilities cannot or will not be undertaken

A couple of things to be noted here. A differentiation is made between ‘abuse’ and ‘serious abuse’ so that one will be covered and the other won’t. What kind of ‘legal’ test would there be to determine when abuse counts as ‘serious’ or not? Can we see children in similar cirumstances being subject to a differentiation of level of care available depending on whether abuse is ‘serious’ or ‘not serious’? And who is doing the judging? Well, I can answer that last question. It is the social worker involved as I am asked as a matter of course to ‘band’ people according to these criteria.

The obvious glaring point is the lack of thought of any kind of preventative work that sticking so closely to the criteria will create. Where is the hope of creating those very creative personal budgets when only the very bare minimum of essential needs are being met.

I can’t claim anything other than relief that Birmingham case was challenged in court. These criteria and these levels of need look at people as lists of what they cannot do. That goes against everything that we know and the ways in which we practice by looking at strengths and looking at people as individuals. However, the reason the criteria were brought in in the first place was to end some of the ‘postcode lottery’ of care provisions and to bring consistency to who was offered what nationally. Of course, the problem remained that interpretations of these criteria vary so the consistency which is objected by ticking boxes (the only way the officials seem to know to apply it) depends, as mentioned previously on the social worker who is doing the ‘judging’.

Back to this case though, it was brought under the Disability Discrimination Act and hopefully the judgement will be available soon. Hopefully too, local authorities around the country will be leafing through it and realising that the wholesale and slapdash cuts that they are imposing are not legal.

As for the government of millionaires, none of them will be reliant on social care support from the council. They can buy in any support that they might potentially need and cannot understand the distress of those who are totally reliant on the availability of services.  They cannot understand the implication of their gung-ho ideological cuts and the thought of Cameron, Clegg and Osborne claiming ‘We’re all in this together’ sticks painfully in the throat.

Although I fully expect Birmingham to challenge this ruling, I hope that the case is held and that some of the trigger happy cutting is stopped and the very real effect of the cuts agenda is shouted out more loudly and more clearly – not just for those of us who are personally losing services but to raise our voices with those who cannot always shout so loudly.

That is what social justice is about and that is what social working is about.

Weekly Social Work Links 11

I am going to have to do a quicker than usual ‘round up’ this week because I’m heading off to the March this morning.

But it has been a fantastic week in terms of the richness of posts.

I’ve already written a post about why I am marching today but this post by SocialJerk about the situation regarding housing in New York opened my eyes. This is where we are heading.

On the subject of housing Malcolm Payne writes about the ways that the social work role is described in literature provided for housing staff and he raises a lot of the issues of the confusion about the definition of the social work role and the issue of  why ‘social worker’ is often confused with ‘local authority social worker’ in the UK.

Ladybird writes about the ‘ripple effect’ of the cuts in her own service.

A Social Worker’s View talks of the problems raised by a shortage of condoms in Kenya. Something to bear in mind from my often anglocentric world view.

The Masked AMHP and the next stage of his explanation of the tribunal process ‘When Detained Patients Appeal’ series and the story of what happens in a tribunal.  Sometimes I forget how alien some aspects of my job may seem to others. I haven’t ever written about tribunals. Perhaps one day I’ll pop up with some of my own thoughts and experiences.

How Not to Do Social Work has a time for decisions and contemplates burnout. A potential hazard of the trade.

And Nectarine on Going Mental  raises the issue of noise in the office. I feel her pain.

While Social Worker Mom asks when it’s no longer healthy to work with a particular client.

A Case Manager’s Verse talks about issues regarding communication via email at work. Many interesting points raised that I hadn’t considered and some I had but hadn’t quantified.

Jamie Middleton writes about the importance of pets to someone’s mental wellbeing.

JaeRan Kim writes another thoughtful post about treating difference and perceptions about mainstream integration and the place of disability culture when moving towards fully integrated societies. Food for thought.

Dorlee at Social Work Career Development has a great interview with an art therapist about her work.

Nancy Smyth at Virtual Connections has a post about the use of Second Life and a PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) simulation. I remain a little uneasy about this kind of simulation. I haven’t had any experience of using second life and remain generally sceptical but it is interesting to read about these programmes and how they may be used. Maybe I’m just being a fuddy-duddy!

Speaking of which, I’ll sign off with an post from the Social Work Tech Blog about using a ‘Social Work Digital Toolbox’ and there are some useful ideas there if you have an iPad or want to justify the acquisition of one ‘because it would be good for work’.

To sign off though, I’m going to link to this video of the Andrew Lansley Rap.

The Disgrace of Individual Budgets

I have a few words for Paul Burstow, the Minister responsible for Care Services, who is appalled, according to Community Care, about the low take up and roll out of personal budgets in Adult Services – the take up is so far only 13%.

He said to his party’s conference

“It’s disgraceful. We need to be far more critical of public services. Why are they not willing to let go of control?” He was speaking at a Liberal Democrat conference fringe session on social care and the government’s Big Society agenda.

Excuse me for a moment while I scream with frustration.

Back.

NOT WILLING TO LET GO OF CONTROL?

What does he think that the lack of roll-out is to do with a nefarious political plot to hold on to the control aspect?

No, it’s not. It’s all to do with poorly adapted and poorly administrated systems and piloted exclusively in teams and departments that were ‘easy’.

Where are those 13%? I can bet they are with adults with physical disabilities and adults with learning disabilities where a lot more resources and efforts had been pumped into direct payments so they had a sound base to start on.

That 13% is also likely to include older adults who have capacity and families to help advocate for them.

We have some quite rightly wonderful accessible easy read documentation for the forms with beautiful pictures that show who effective support planning can be in the learning disabilities field – but where is the real research for people who may lack capacity to make decisions due to dementia – for whom the same type of documentation is not relevant because in general, those who are support planning will have much less time and much less money to ‘be creative’.

Where the systems have not picked up is with those who do not have the families and friends who are able to invest a lot of time into creating personalised packages – of the people who do not have the capacity to manage and organise their own care – for whom the system of individual budgets will not change anything too dramatically.

I wish Mr Burstow would meet and talk with people who actually DO the job to understand the difficulties, rather than meeting and talking to people who manage people who do the job or people who write the policies or people who audit accounts.

I want to give up control. Believe me I do. It might mean some respite in the constant stream of care management duties that spring up incessently. Sometimes though, it isn’t all about retaining control but maintaining quality as well. Sure, if a capacitious decision is made, all is well and good and the right remains, as it should, with the end user, but where there is a decision that needs to be made on behalf of another person, the choices are already limited.

Why should someone have a potentially poorer service through a provider agency because they are not able to manage a bank account and do not have anyone who can assist them – sure, theoretically the local authority can hold the account but who makes the decisions about PAs and flexibility?

There is little doubt that high quality regular care provided by a small group of people or person is the favoured option for those that have successful care packages. People whose direct payments have been most successful have worked because of the people they have employed directly as often as not. However this is not a service which is offered through this system to people who lack the capacity to act as employers and who either don’t have families or don’t have people who can do this on their behalf – they still remain with agency providers which most people agree offer a poorer service.

This is my gripe and my main upset with this system. It is inherently discriminating and providing a poorer service to people who don’t understand the systems. If social workers had caseloads of 10, we might be able to do this on someone’s behalf but it is not possible with the workloads that are carried in older adults services.

So the people who ‘can’ get a gold star service and the people who ‘can’t’ get exactly the same as they always got.

That is both demoralising and unfair. It makes me cynical of the whole system and those who advocate it because perhaps if this could have been thought through at the time, we wouldn’t be lagging so far behind of targets.

Sure, I’ve been to the training, I know about the trust funds that can be created to manage care but how many people in older adults’ services are going to have packages that pay enough to establish and operate a trust fund as well as paying for it’s maintenance. The answer is not very many.

The way the  roll out has been managed, stinks. For people it works for, it works very well – but there are many people whose needs and wishes have not been able to be accounted for in the way the forms have been written and the way the processes work. That might be unique to the local authority I work in – it must work well somewhere.

But these lavish statements of Mr Burstow, they grate incessently and I say that as someone who would love this system to work but who is ground into dust by the ways it has been implemented.